Transforming Network Infrastructure Industry News

TMCNet:  Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Aneurysms Saves More Lives Than Surgery, 10-Year Study Reports at ISET 2013

[January 22, 2013]

Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Aneurysms Saves More Lives Than Surgery, 10-Year Study Reports at ISET 2013

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. --(Business Wire)--

Patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are more than twice as likely to survive if they have minimally invasive repair than if they have surgery, suggests a 10-year study being presented at the 25th annual International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy (ISET).

The aorta is the body's main artery and about 90 percent of people who suffer from ruptured AAAs bleed to death. Those who make it to the hospital undergo either open surgical repair or minimally invasive treatment with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR).

"Many of these patients are frail, with a variety of health issues, and a minimally invasive solution is by far the best option," said Sherif Sultan, M.B., M.D., an endovascular surgeon at the University College Hospital Galway, Ireland. "We found 85 percnt of patients are suitable for EVAR and in those patients it should always be the first option."

The study involved 106 patients who had AAA repair between 2002 and 2012, 75 of whom had open surgery and 31 of whom had EVAR. Overall mortality was higher for surgery patients, with 49 (65 percent) dying within 30 days vs. 10 (32 percent) of those who had EVAR. After one year, 12.5 percent of surgery patients were alive vs. 56 percent of EVAR patients.

AAA is a weakening and ballooning in the aorta, the artery that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body. AAA is most common in men 65 years or older. Other risk factors include a history of smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and atherosclerosis.

Open surgical repair of the aorta involves making a 12-inch incision in the chest and cracking open the ribs to access the aorta. The patient is placed on partial heart-lung bypass, the aorta is clamped off and a fabric graft sewn into place.

EVAR involves threading a collapsed fabric tube, or endograft, through a catheter into a small incision in the groin artery and advancing it through the artery to the site of the tear in the aorta. The endograft is expanded in place, and blood flow is redirected through it, sealing off the tear.

For more about ISET, visit www.ISET.org.


[ Back To Transforming Network Infrastructure's Homepage ]




Featured Blog Entries

Reflections from an Interop Veteran and Alum

When I returned to the Fiber Mountain™ offices in Connecticut after exhibiting at Interop Las Vegas 2015, I couldn’t help but think about how much the event has evolved through the years. I have been attending this seminal IT and networking conference since its inception in 1986 when it was called the TCP/IP Vendor Workshop, focused on interoperability of various TCP/IP program stacks.

What Fiber Mountain's Interop Recognition Means for Our Industry

When Fiber Mountain™ began its journey with a launch at Interop New York last fall, we certainly believed that we had a solution that would make a significant impact in the data center space.

What On-Board Optics Means for Density and Flexibility

This past week I read an article in Lightwave Magazine and another in Network World about the formation of the Consortium for On-board Optics (COBO), a group that seeks to create specifications and increase the faceplate density of data center switches and adapters.

Scaling Hyperscale in an Age of Exponential Growth and Virtualization

Over the past several years server, network, storage and application virtualization has revolutionized the way hyperscale data centers are built by consolidating workloads. The trend has simplified network architecture significantly and resulted in huge cost savings as well.

Video Showcase